Week Thirteen: Final Product

Final Iteration

3D Printed Model (Version 1)

Snapseed 9Front of VR

We picked up our 3D printed model on Monday. Unfortunately, it did not turn out like we’d expected. Maja told us that the lab technician printed the walls thicker than we had specified and we noted three major issues with the model:

  1. The shape of the knobs made it impossible for the cover to fit into the body of the headset.
  2. Due to the thickness of the walls, there was not enough space between the cover and the body for a smartphone to fit inside.
  3. The hole for the nose was too small so it made it impossible to wear the device.

Updated 3D Model

We made several modifications to our 3D model to address the aforementioned issues. We also took this opportunity to make additional tweaks for other things that we saw room for improvement. The following changes were:

  • We reduced the hinge from 2 hinges into 1 hinge. Since we are splitting the model in half to print it, the two pieces of the body will allow us to “sandwich” the hinge of the cover, thus avoiding the issue we faced before.
  • We increased the spaces between the knobs themselves as a precaution.
  • The bottom ledge used to hold the phone was made longer and thinner to make sure a smartphone had enough space to fit inside.
  • Increased the size of the hole for the nose. We also reshaped this hole so that it is slanted at an angle, just like the natural shape of the human nose. (Before it was shaped like a rectangle).
  • As per Ken’s suggestion, we reduced the thickness of most walls in case they get printed thicker again.
  • Increased the height of the slits for the head strap since the elastic band is wider than the slits in our previous model.
  • Increased the radius of the arc (the space that is pressed against the forehead) so that it can completely block out light. The previous arc was too shallow.
  • Reduced the height of the cover so that it has a softer curve.

We sent the updated model to Maja for review and for a second round of 3D printing on Tuesday.

Final 3D Render

render.jpg

Orthographic View

orthographic-04.png

Exploded View

isometric-02

 

Assembly

3D Printed Model (Version 2)

On Thursday, we picked up our new 3D printed model and it turned out perfectly this time! All of the adjustments we made were reflected in the model:

  • The two halves of the body sandwiched and secured the cover like we planned.
  • The hole is large enough to fit different nose sizes; a smartphone can be placed inside the headset.
  • The slits are large enough to fit the elastic.
  • The arc wraps around the forehead snuggly and prevents light leaks.

As a result of the size constraints of the 3D printing, we had to split the body of the headset in half. This meant that we had to glue it together before spray painting it. After doing some research, we decided to join our headset with superglue since it would be the thinnest adhesive to apply, which was an important factor since we didn’t want an extremely visible gap between the model. Since the superglue is in a very tiny squeeze tube, we wanted to act quick before the adhesive dried by applying it with a paintbrush on large areas. Prior to applying the glue, we sanded down the area to make sure we were attaching the parts with as much surface area as possible. First, we hooked the front cover with one of the hinge knobs to hold it in place, applied the glue onto one half of the headset, then hooked the other hinge into the cover while aligning the two headset pieces together, then we held it for a couple of minutes until the adhesive set.

Spray Painting

As mentioned last week, we bought a can of Krylon ColorMaster™ Paint + Primer Spray Paint in Smoke Grey. The can instructed us to shake it for 1-2 minutes before and during painting. We set the model down and began spraying it in a horizontal motion to make sure the paint was being applied evenly. After spraying all sides, we set it down to dry with the front cover up, since the only parts touching the ground would be the thinnest edge of the headset. It takes 10 minutes to dry, but an hour to actually be dry enough for handling. After an hour, we decided to apply another layer as some parts looked like they didn’t get as much coverage. The second layer seemed to have covered all the parts.

Head strap

The wide knit elastic strap was trimmed to wrap behind the head, leaving some room for securing on the left side and room for Velcro to be sewn on the other side. Then each end slid into their respective slits and sewn.

Corrugated Cardstock

Originally we chose a lighter colour palette, but after spray painting we decided to just use black corrugated cardboard. While the colours are different, it still blends in nicely in an office setting.

To cut out the piece for the cover, we traced the cover over the flat side of the corrugated card stock and then cut against the lines. For the strip around the headset body, we estimated the width of the strip, cut several strips and then traced a circle for the knob on the top and a triangular shape for the nose opening at the bottom for cutting. Luckily, the corrugated card stock made it so that even if our strips weren’t long enough to wrap around the whole body, it still wasn’t noticeable that we attached multiple strips after each other.

To attach them onto the headset, we simply used double sided tape so that it would easily stick on, and wouldn’t stick out too much since the tape is very thin.

Felt

IMG_8701

The felt was cut into long pieces to line the areas where it would touch the forehead, cheeks and nose.

Lenses + Elastic

For the elastic, we chose to go with a stretchy, elastic cotton that was already tied together in a loop. After cutting it, we looped it through the holes on the cover and glued them back together using superglue.

Final Product

Headset with smartphone

Interaction: Opening/Closing Cover

Interaction: Adjusting Head Strap

IMG_7990.jpg

 

Week Twelve: Preparation for Fabrication

3D Model

After receiving our 1:1 model was approved by Ken and Xavier, we met with Maja to figure out the best way to prepare our files for 3D printing. Due to the size constraints of the 3D printing, we decided to split the body of the headset in half, as shown below. The cover was within the size limit so we decided to keep it as one piece.

 

We finished the model (which was completely built in SolidWorks) and sent it to Maja for review and for printing on Friday. Since our headset will require supports, it will be printed on the Fortus with ABS plastic.

 

 

Orthographic views

orthographic_old-01

 

Preparing Materials

In preparation for fabrication and assembly next week, we purchased multiple materials in advance. We made sure all of the materials reflected our muted, neutral colour palette.

Krylon spray paint

As per Ken’s feedback in lab, we bought Krylon spray paint in smoke gray. This will be used on all of the 3D printed material, on all sides.

IMG_3469

Cardstock

We bought several sheets of corrugated card stock from Daiso to give our headset more interesting tactile qualities. We chose single sided corrugated card stock so that it can lie flat against the plastic and avoid creating unattractive gaps in between the material. Although each package of card stock comes in several colours, we will only be using the white and dark grey card stock so it fits our persona and colour palette. The white card stock will be wrapped around the front half of the body of the headset. The dark grey card stock will be used for the cover.

 

Elastic

For the head strap, we purchased a black, stretchy, knitted elastic from Fabricland. In order to provide maximum comfort, we opted for a wider band that is very stretchy as opposed to the narrower and more rigid alternatives that the store provided.

Velcro

To accommodate people with different head sizes, we felt it was important to make the head strap adjustable. Therefore, we bought velcro, also from Fabricland. This will be sewn onto one side of the wide elastic so the wearer can modify the length to help the head strap fit snuggly around their head.

Week Eleven – 1:1 Model, Material, Fabrication Method

Revised Concept

After meeting with Ken about our small-scale models, we decided to go ahead with Concept #1. As per Ken’s suggestion, we went for a more rectangular shape with rounded corners (as opposed to the previous oval shape) so that the screen of the smartphone will not get cut off. We also decided to go for a rotatable cover with a piece of elastic that will be secured onto a knob on top of the headset. This was inspired by Ken’s suggestion on using a string attachment similar to the ones used on envelopes.

1:1 Model

 

Moodboard

moodboard

Since our persona works in an office setting and needs to use his VR headset discretely, we opted for a muted color palette that can easily blend into the office environment, including the office supplies on his desk.

 

Material + Fabrication

material-pla

 

Polylactic Acid (PLA)
A biodegradable thermoplastic derived from renewable resources like corn starch or sugar cane, frequently used for 3D printing. It has a shiny and smoother appearance.

 

Where it will be used: The entire frame of the VR headset.

Fabrication method: 3D printed into multiple pieces, then glued together.

 

material-cardstock

 

Corrugated Card Stock
A type of paperboard that is thicker and more durable than writing paper, it’s corrugated on both sides, providing texture. It is lightweight and cost-effective.

 

Where it will be used: Wrapped around the front half of the headset, including the cover that secures the phone.

Fabrication method: A large strip will be cut out with a Xacto knife, then glued onto the headset. Smaller pieces will then be cut out and layered onto the large strip to create additional texture and depth.

 

material-foam

 

Foam
Flexible foam, otherwise known as open-cell structure foam is relatively soft, providing cushioning.

 

 

Where it will be used: Lined along the back of the headset where the user’s forehead and nose make contact.

Fabrication method: Trimmed with scissors then glued onto the headset.

 

afeb0c84-f3e2-b026-0ecf-d9b6269359ea

 

Nylon Fabric Webbing
A strong fabric that’s been woven into a flat webbing strip, commonly used for backpack straps. To allow adjustability, a plastic strap slide would also need to be used with the webbing for fastening.

 

Where it will be used: The headband, attached to the back of the headset.

Fabrication method: After it is slid into the slits of the headset, two overlapping pieces will be sewed together to secure the headband.

 

material-elastic

Elastic & Stretchy Cotton
A stretchy form of fabric that is lightweight, thin, and flexible. It is often used for tying things together.

 

 

Where it will be used: It will be attached to the cover so that the user can use it to secure the phone.

Fabrication method: After it is slide into the two holes on the cover, it will be tied together.

 

Orthographic Views

Artboard 1-100.jpg

Week Nine – Material Selection Specification, Functionality, Technology and Timetable

Final Product Material Selection

dsc_0022.jpg

Polylactic Acid (PLA)
A biodegradable thermoplastic derived from renewable resources like corn starch or sugar cane, frequently used for 3D printing. It has a shiny and smoother appearance.

 

 

corrugated-cardstock-12-x12-kraft-corrugated_1639273

 

Corrugated Card Stock
A type of paperboard that is thicker and more durable than writing paper, it’s corrugated on both sides, providing texture. It is lightweight and cost-effective.

 

Foam

 

Foam
Flexible foam, otherwise known as open-cell structure foam is relatively soft, providing cushioning.

 

 

afeb0c84-f3e2-b026-0ecf-d9b6269359ea

 

Nylon Fabric Webbing
A strong fabric that’s been woven into a flat webbing strip, commonly used for backpack straps. To allow adjustability, a plastic strap slide would also need to be used with the webbing for fastening.

Material For Components

updated sketch

For Design #1:

    • Common Material Use (PLA Plastic) – Case structure holding the phone as well as the area that covers the face.
    • Uncommon Material Use (Corrugated Card Stock) – Case cover

Scan Nov 14, 2017, 11.12 PM.jpg

 

 

 

 

For Design # 2

Common Material Use (PLA Plastic) – Phone case structure, brim and headphones

Uncommon Material Use (Corrugated Card Stock) – Straps around the head and front of case structure

Material Processing

PLA Plastic – 3D Printing
Corrugated Card Stock – Cut
Foam – Shaped
Nylon Fabric Webbing – Cut


Functionality Update

End-Use Scenario Context

Based on our final persona, the scenario in which our user will be using this VR headset is in the setting of the persona’s workspace. Charlie is a new employee at a local real estate office branch, his position being an Administrative Assistant. He is responsible for manning the front desk at the office, organizing paperwork and answering phone calls. He finds his job very slow-paced with lots of downtime since not many people stop by the office. The scenario in which Charlie will be using the VR headset is when he can take advantage of this downtime and experience some VR thrills from the comfort of his  desk.

Style of Interaction

interactionsketch.jpgscan-nov-14-2017-11-12-pm-page-2.jpg

Interaction Style for Design #1.

  • Phone clips into the front where it can be easily removed. Using two hands, the strap is slide over the eyes against the back of the head.

 

 

Interaction Style for Design #2

  • Phone is put inside the case and closed shut. The panels at the top are spread out to form a cap shape and using two hands, the headset is put on, against the head.

 


Technology Update

Mechanism Sourcing for Prototype

For Design #1, the mechanisms we will be sourcing are a plastic strap slide, nylon fabric webbing and foam.

For Design #2, the mechanisms we will be sourcing are hinges and foam.


Timetable

Week 10:

  • 4 scaled low-fidelity prototypes due
  • Finalize concept and design
  • Buy materials needed
  • Begin working on 1:1 low fidelity model
  • Update blog

Week 11:

  • 1:1 low fidelity model due, plan out solid space reservations, begin working in SolidSpace
  • Have updated colour, texture and finish of model
  • Update blog

Week 12:

  • Refined 1:1 low fidelity model due, material specification finalized, work in SolidSpace
  • Complete functional prototype and presentation poster
  • Update blog

Week 13:

  • Final blog, functional prototype and presentation poster due

Week Eight – Initial Sketches

For week eight, our team had to prepare 12 initial sketches (3 per team member) for our VR headset. When brainstorming ideas, we also had to consider the persona we created last week as well as the materiality of our chosen materials (plastic and paper).

Through feedback from our classmates, we decided on two ideas to continue on with for scaled low-fidelity styrene prototypes for next week. Below are the sketches from team VEE-AR.

Wendy's Sketches

IrisSketch

 

Week Seven – Material Posters, Personas

Team Vee-Ar’s first blog post begins in week seven of IAT 336. We were asked to research a common and uncommon material (plastic and paper/card) as our chosen material for our VR headsets. Below is the final copy of our posters that we presented.

MaterialsPosterCardboardPoster

In addition, each member in our group of 4 created our own personas that we would potentially go forward with for the upcoming weeks. We created our personas based on the potential end-use applications for the VR headsets. We chose Travel as our application type where the users will be able to explore other cultures using the device.

Below are scans of personas we created. (click on them to see it in more detail)

After reviewing all of our personas, we decided to go forward with one of them (Charlie) and develop it a bit more.

Scan Oct 30, 2017, 4.17 PM page 1